Failure of thermoregulation in the cold during hypoglycaemia induced by exercise and ethanol

pubmed-ncbi-logos

Author(s): Haight JS, Keatinge WR

Journal: J. Physiol. (Lond.) 1973 Feb;229(1):87-97

1. After young men had exercised for approximately 2 hr at 70% maximum O(2) uptake, and taken 28 ml. ethanol by mouth, their mean blood glucose fell to 2.17 mM. It fell further to 1.77 mM during a 30 min exposure to air at 14.5 degrees C. Plasma lactate, glycerol, beta-hydroxybutyrate and free fatty acid concentrations increased.2. Rectal temperature fell to reach a mean level of 34.49 degrees C by the end of the cold exposure; oesophageal temperature fell to as low as 33.00 degrees C in one case.3. Virtually no increase in metabolic rate and no visible shivering occurred during the cold exposure.4. Administration of glucose (mean 60.4 g) prevented the falls in temperature, and restored metabolic response to the cold to the size found in control experiments without exercise or ethanol.5. Neither exercise without ethanol or ethanol without exercise significantly lowered the blood glucose or impaired the maintenance of body temperature in the cold.6. One obese subject showed almost as great a fall in blood glucose and depression of metabolic response to cold as the thinner men, but no fall in body temperature.

Dermatology Journal and/or Publisher

Journal Name: The Journal of physiology
Journal Abbreviation: J. Physiol. (Lond.)
Journal Volume: 229, Issue: 1
Journal Date Published: 1973-02-01

National Center for Biotechnology Information

PMI ID: 4689995
Article: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4689995
Created: 1973-05-02

Abstract Source: National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine Abstract Query for “Hidradenitis suppurativa”

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